My work, broadly speaking, is based on the observation of objects. I am mostly interested in how inherent references of the familiar and the material place objects into contexts, histories, and various other narratives. The ceramic forms I make play with our understanding of material culture. Packaging, consumer items, historic pieces—these are all things I like to consider in my object making. I want to understand how an object can be loaded with a set of communicating elements, how image can function in a fabricated, three-dimensional form. My ambition is to develop truly unique works through the appropriation and synthesis of often contradictory references. Originally from the Detroit suburbs, William DePauw has been teaching ceramic object making in some form for 14 years, he has held a faculty position in the Newcomb Art Department at Tulane University for the ten years teaching all levels of undergraduate ceramics, mentoring graduate students, and maintaining the ceramics lab.  CV

My work, broadly speaking, is based on the observation of objects. I am mostly interested in how inherent references of the familiar and the material place objects into contexts, histories, and various other narratives. The ceramic forms I make play with our understanding of material culture. Packaging, consumer items, historic pieces—these are all things I like to consider in my object making. I want to understand how an object can be loaded with a set of communicating elements, how image can function in a fabricated, three-dimensional form. My ambition is to develop truly unique works through the appropriation and synthesis of often contradictory references.

Originally from the Detroit suburbs, William DePauw has been teaching ceramic object making in some form for 14 years, he has held a faculty position in the Newcomb Art Department at Tulane University for the ten years teaching all levels of undergraduate ceramics, mentoring graduate students, and maintaining the ceramics lab. 

CV